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IELTS Reading Test Passage Multiple-Choice Questions (Choosing Three Answers from Seven Choices)

IELTS Reading Test Passage Multiple-Choice Questions (Choosing Three Answers from Seven Choices)

In today’s free IELTS materials we will practise answering multiple choice questions in the reading test.

For multiple-choice questions, you must choose the correct answer(s) based on the reading.

Multiple-choice questions test your ability to understand the main idea of the relevant paragraphs and require you to look for specific information in the text.


Types of Multiple-Choice Questions

There are three types of multiple-choice questions that you could be required to answer in the IELTS Reading Test.

Choose one answer from four choices (A, B, C or D)

Choose two answers from five choices (A, B, C, D or E)

Choose three answers from seven choices (A, B, C, D, E, F or G)

It is very important that you read the instruction carefully, so you know how many answers you are looking for!

In today’s materials we will look at multiple-choice questions where you need to choose three answers from seven choices (A, B, C, D, E, F or G).

In the real test, a combination of different question types will be used for each reading passage, but for this exercise we will use an extract from a full passage and practise multiple choice questions.

Read the extract and answer the question that follows.


The Rise of Renewable Energy

Renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric power, have gained increasing attention in recent years as alternatives to traditional fossil fuels. The shift towards such renewables is driven by concerns over climate change, energy security, and environmental sustainability.

Solar energy, derived from the sun’s radiation, is one of the fastest-growing renewable energy sources. Photovoltaic cells, commonly known as solar panels, convert sunlight into electricity, providing a clean and abundant source of power. Solar energy is particularly well-suited for decentralised applications, such as rooftop installations on homes and businesses, as well as large-scale solar farms in sunny regions.

Wind power is another rapidly expanding renewable energy technology. Wind turbines harness the kinetic energy of the wind to generate electricity. They are typically installed in windy areas, both onshore and offshore, where they can produce significant amounts of power. Advances in turbine design and efficiency have made wind energy increasingly competitive with conventional fossil fuels.

Hydroelectric power, generated from flowing water, has long been a major source of renewable energy worldwide. Large dams and reservoirs are built to capture the energy of rivers and streams, converting it into electricity through turbines and generators. Hydroelectric plants can provide a reliable source of baseload power, meaning they can operate continuously to meet demand, unlike some other forms of renewable energy.

Despite the advantages of renewable energy, there are challenges to its widespread adoption. One challenge is intermittency, as solar and wind power generation depends on weather conditions. Energy storage technologies, such as batteries and pumped hydro storage, are being developed to address this issue. Additionally, the upfront costs of all three types of renewable energy systems mentioned can be higher than utilising existing fossil fuel infrastructure, although the long-term benefits in terms of reduced emissions and energy independence often outweigh these initial investments.

Despite the difficulties, many countries have embraced the challenge. At the time of writing, China is the global renewable energy leader and nearly half of the world’s total operating wind and solar capacity is located there. 98% of electricity generation in Norway comes from renewables, with Uruguay standing at 91% with hydropower being its main source. 84% of New Zealand’s electricity usage is renewable sourced from geothermal, solar, wind, and hydroelectric power. Morocco has harnessed the power of its abundant sun and has become a world leader in solar energy. Africa’s largest wind farm is in Kenya; and Costa Rica, like Norway, produces 98% of its electricity from renewable sources, in Costa Rica’s case using a combination of hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, biomass and solar power.

Multiple Choice Question:

Which of the following statements are true for all three energy sources: solar, wind and hydroelectric power?

Choose THREE letters A-G.

A) Set up is more expensive than using traditional energy sources.

B) Can operate without interruption.

C) Recent developments have improved efficiency.

D) Used in Morocco and Uruguay.

E) Well suited for independent use at individual premises.

F) Awareness has grown in the last few years.

G) Used in Costa Rica and New Zealand.


Answers

A) ‘Additionally, the upfront costs of all three types of renewable energy systems mentioned can be higher than utilising existing fossil fuel infrastructure…’

F) ‘Renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric power, have gained increasing attention in recent years as alternatives to traditional fossil fuels.’

G) ‘84% of New Zealand’s electricity usage is renewable sourced from geothermal, solar, wind, and hydroelectric power…’ ‘…in Costa Rica’s case using a combination of hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, biomass and solar power.’

Note:

B) Relates to hydroelectric power only. ‘Hydroelectric plants can provide a reliable source of baseload power, meaning they can operate continuously to meet demand, unlike some other forms of renewable energy.’

C) Relates to wind power only. ‘Advances in turbine design and efficiency have made wind energy increasingly competitive with conventional fossil fuels.’

D) The passage does not say that Morocco and Uruguay use all three renewable power sources.

E) Relates to solar power only. ‘Solar energy is particularly well-suited for decentralised applications, such as rooftop installations on homes and businesses.’

How did you do?

Here are some tips for tackling multiple choice questions in IELTS.


Tips

It’s generally a good idea to skim the passage first before looking at the answer options. Circle keywords or main ideas that might help you locate the relevant information later.

Read the instructions carefully: Understand what the question is asking you to do. Pay attention to any specific instructions such as selecting one answer or multiple answers.

Read the questions. Pay close attention to any keywords or phrases that tell you what type of answer you are looking for.

Eliminate wrong answers. After reading the answer options, try to eliminate any that are obviously incorrect. Try to identify information in the passage that directly supports or contradicts each option.

There will generally be a reference to all the possible choices, but the incorrect answers will clearly be wrong or will be incomplete.

Go back to the passage and read the relevant paragraphs carefully. Pay attention to relevant details such as dates, names, and specific examples.

Beware of answer choices that are designed to trick you. They may contain information that is mentioned in the passage but is not directly relevant to the question or states an opposite idea.

Avoid wasting time! Don’t spend too much time on any single question. If you get stuck, move on to the next question and come back to it later.

If you are still not sure about an answer, make an educated guess! There is no penalty for incorrect answers in the IELTS reading test so don’t leave any questions unanswered.

Practise regularly: This will help you become more confident and efficient in answering questions under time pressure.

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