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C2 words for IELTS Group 2

C2 words for IELTS Group 2

Achieving CEFR level C2 vocabulary proficiency is crucial for excelling in the IELTS exam. A rich vocabulary enables better comprehension in Listening and Reading sections, enhances writing quality, and facilitates fluent expression in the Speaking section. Ultimately, it leads to higher scores and better opportunities.

Here are 30 words that can make the difference between Band 6.5 or Band 7.0+

Conundruma confusing and difficult problem or question

Examples:

  • Solving this math problem was a conundrum that took me hours to figure out.
  • The mystery of the missing keys was a conundrum that baffled the detectives.
  • The ethical conundrum of cloning is still being debated by scientists and lawmakers.

Ephemerallasting for a very short time

Examples:

  • The beauty of cherry blossoms is ephemeral and only lasts for a few days.
  • The success of the internet startup was ephemeral and it quickly went bankrupt.
  • The popularity of the latest fashion trend is ephemeral and it will soon be replaced by something else.

Inscrutabledifficult to understand or interpret

Examples:

  • The politician’s motives were inscrutable and no one knew what he was really after.
  • The ancient text was inscrutable to the modern scholar without translation.
  • The expression on his face was inscrutable, making it hard to tell if he was happy or sad.

Myriada very large number or variety

Examples:

  • The city had a myriad of restaurants to choose from.
  • The book contained a myriad of facts and figures about the history of the region.
  • The artist used a myriad of colors to create a vibrant and complex painting.

Nefariouswicked or criminal

Examples:

  • The nefarious plot of the villains was to take over the world.
  • The nefarious actions of the dictator were condemned by the international community.
  • The thieves had a nefarious plan to rob the bank and get away with the money.

Querulouscomplaining or whining in a petulant manner

Examples:

  • The querulous customer complained about the service even though nothing was wrong.
  • The querulous child whined about not getting the toy he wanted.
  • The querulous tone of her voice annoyed her coworkers.

Salientmost noticeable or important

Examples:

  • The salient point of the argument was that the proposal was too expensive.
  • The salient feature of the new car was its fuel efficiency.
  • The salient fact in the case was that the defendant had an alibi for the time of the crime.

Ubiquitouspresent, appearing, or found everywhere

Examples:

  • Smartphones are ubiquitous in modern society.
  • Fast food chains are ubiquitous in the United States.
  • The internet is ubiquitous and connects people all over the world.

Vexatiouscausing annoyance, frustration, or worry

Examples:

  • The vexatious delay in the flight schedule caused many passengers to miss their connecting flights.
  • The vexatious noise of the construction site next door kept the neighbors up all night.
  • The vexatious behavior of the students disrupted the class and made it difficult to teach.

Zealoushaving great enthusiasm or passion for something

Examples:

  • The zealous soccer fans cheered loudly for their team.
  • The zealous entrepreneur worked tirelessly to build her company from the ground up.
  • The zealous artist poured his heart and soul into his paintings.

Aberrationa departure from what is normal, usual, or expected

Examples:

  • The sudden rain in the middle of summer was an aberration from the usual weather pattern.
  • The politician’s stance on the issue was an aberration from his party’s platform.
  • The athlete’s poor performance in the competition was an aberration from his usual record.

Bombastichigh-sounding but with little meaning, inflated

Examples:

  • The politician’s speech was filled with bombastic rhetoric that didn’t address any real issues.
  • The artist’s abstract paintings were often criticized for their bombastic use of color and form.
  • The CEO’s email to employees was filled with bombastic language about the company’s success.

Cacophonya harsh, discordant mixture of sounds

Examples:

  • The construction site next door was a cacophony of drilling, hammering, and shouting.
  • The city traffic during rush hour was a cacophony of honking, screeching, and revving engines.
  • The band’s performance was marred by a cacophony of out-of-tune instruments and off-beat rhythms.

Disparageregard or represent as being of little worth, belittle

Examples:

  • The critic’s review disparaged the movie as being cliché and unoriginal.
  • The boss’s constant criticism and disparagement of his employees demotivated the team.
  • The politician’s opponent disparaged his record as a failed leader.

Enigmaa person, thing, or situation that is mysterious, puzzling, or difficult to understand

Examples:

  • The disappearance of the plane remains an enigma to investigators.
  • The artist’s abstract painting was an enigma to many viewers who couldn’t decipher its meaning.
  • The sudden change in the CEO’s behavior was an enigma to his employees.

Furtiveattempting to avoid notice or attention, secretive

Examples:

  • The spy’s furtive movements were captured on video by a surveillance camera.
  • The teenager’s furtive attempts to sneak out of the house at night were thwarted by her parents.
  • The employee’s furtive glance at her phone during the meeting was noticed by her boss.

Gregariousfond of company, sociable

Examples:

  • The gregarious host of the party made everyone feel welcome and included.
  • The dog was so gregarious that it greeted every visitor to the house with wagging tail.
  • The politician’s gregarious personality made him popular among his constituents.

Harbingera person or thing that announces or signals the approach of another

Examples:

  • The first snowfall of the year is often seen as a harbinger of winter.
  • The economic downturn was a harbinger of the recession that was to come.
  • The sudden drop in the stock market was a harbinger of the financial crisis.

Axiomaticself-evident, unquestionable

Examples:

  • It’s axiomatic that all living things need water to survive.
  • The idea that people have the right to free speech is axiomatic in democratic societies.
  • It’s axiomatic that two parallel lines will never intersect.

Equanimitycalmness, composure, evenness of temper

Examples:

  • The surgeon maintained her equanimity throughout the lengthy and complex operation.
  • He faced the criticism with equanimity and did not let it bother him.
  • Even when the situation got heated, she remained a model of equanimity.

Genuflectto kneel, bow or bend in reverence or worship

Examples:

  • When entering the church, many people will genuflect and cross themselves.
  • The athlete genuflected before the game as a sign of respect for his opponents.
  • As a gesture of gratitude, she genuflected before her mentor and thanked him.

Intransigentstubborn, unwilling to compromise

Examples:

  • The union leaders were intransigent in their demands for higher wages.
  • Despite the overwhelming evidence, he remained intransigent in his belief that the Earth was flat.
  • She found it difficult to work with intransigent colleagues who refused to consider other viewpoints.

Juxtaposeto place side by side for comparison or contrast

Examples:

  • The exhibit juxtaposed contemporary art with classic paintings from the Renaissance.
  • The author juxtaposed the protagonist’s inner thoughts with her outward actions.
  • The contrast between the modern skyscrapers and the historic buildings is striking when they are juxtaposed.

Limpidclear, transparent, easy to understand

Examples:

  • Her voice was as limpid and pure as a mountain stream.
  • The explanation was so limpid that even a child could understand it.
  • The writer’s style is limpid, making his ideas accessible to readers.

Metamorphosisa profound change in form or nature

Examples:

  • The butterfly undergoes a metamorphosis from a caterpillar to a winged insect.
  • The town underwent a metamorphosis from a sleepy village to a bustling metropolis.
  • Her experiences during the war caused a metamorphosis in her beliefs and attitudes.

Perspicacioushaving keen insight, mentally sharp

Examples:

  • The perspicacious detective quickly solved the crime.
  • The student’s perspicacious analysis of the poem impressed her teacher.
  • She is known for her perspicacious observations and insightful comments.

Querulouscomplaining, whining, fretful

Examples:

  • The querulous child constantly asked “Are we there yet?” during the long car ride.
  • The patient was querulous and demanded constant attention from the nurses.
  • Her querulous tone of voice made it difficult for others to take her seriously.

Vituperateto criticize or berate harshly, to use abusive language towards

Examples:

  • The politician vituperated his opponent during the debate, using personal attacks instead of addressing the issues.
  • He vituperated his boss in a scathing email that he later regretted sending.
  • Her mother-in-law would often vituperate her cooking, making her feel unwelcome in her own home.

Nonplussedbewildered, confused, unsure how to react

Examples:

  • He was nonplussed by her unexpected confession of love.
  • The teacher was nonplussed when the student asked a question that she couldn’t answer.
  • She was left feeling nonplussed by the strange turn of events.

Obduratestubborn, unyielding, resistant to persuasion

Examples:

  • The obdurate child refused to eat her vegetables, no matter how much her parents pleaded.
  • The obdurate boss would not listen to any suggestions from her employees.
  • Despite the overwhelming evidence, the obdurate defendant maintained his innocence.

Ready to test your skills? Try this test! Using words from the list above, choose the most suitable word to complete each of the sentences below.

This is C2 words for IELTS – Group 2. Have you seen the CEFR Level C2 Group 1 list?

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